Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Traditional & Alternative Medicine Birmingham, UK.

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Zhang-Jin Zhang

The University of Hong Kong, China

Keynote: Herbal medicine and acupuncture for psychiatric disorders: From bedside to bench (“B2B”)

Time : 08:30-09:05

OMICS International Traditional Medicine 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Zhang-Jin Zhang photo
Biography:

Abstract:

The founding of the BAcC 20 years ago was a significant moment for professional acupuncture in the UK. Prior to the genesis of the British Acupuncture Council, there were five separate professional registers. The review looks at the development of acupuncture in the UK, where it is used by the UK public, honours efforts to ensure that the acupuncture profession maintains high standards, and how it was increasingly recognised as a result of PR and marketing activities. Areas to be highlighted:\\r\\n• Applications for acupuncture in the UK\\r\\n• Education - meeting World Health Organization standards of education and training. Together with the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board we have seen teaching institutions and their graduates become more professional as educators and as practitioners – not just in their knowledge and skill levels, but in their right conduct and processes enacted from the professional values we espouse. \\r\\n• PR and marketing- the conference session will highlight activity such as the annual awareness week, animations and videos\\r\\n• BAcC conferences - which have continued to enhance the status and credentials of the BAcC, not just in the UK but globally.\\r\\n

OMICS International Traditional Medicine 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul Keogh photo
Biography:

Paul Keogh is a qualified Naturopath and Medical Herbalist as well as the Co-founder and Technical Director of Global Therapeutics Pty Ltd. He has been researching and developing integrated Chinese and Western herbal medicine products for more than 25 years including 15 years’ in clinical practice.

Abstract:

Minor Bupleurum Combination (MBC) is a formula of seven botanicals used for Shaoyang syndrome in East Asia for more than 1800 years. This study was to investigate the potential antiallergic effects of MBC by evaluating the potential binding modes of compounds from SST to the human histamine H1 receptor. A virtual screening (VS) strategy based on the Multiple Fragment Molecular Dynamics (MFMD) method with was applied in this study to screen for potential histamine receptor antagonist constituents in MBC of the 13 selected compounds, 10-gingerol, 6-gingerol, 6-shogaol, baicalin and baicalein demonstrated the ability to bind to the histamine H1 receptor at helices III, V and VI, and thus antagonize the action of histamine. The results of this study suggest that MBC may act as a histamine receptor antagonist and deserves further investigation of its antiallergic potential. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first time MFMD/VS has been used to demonstrate the histamine receptor antagonist action of active constituents in Minor Bupleurum Combination.

  • Track 3: Acupuncture-Treatment & Applications & Track 4: Traditional Physical Therapies
Location: Conference Hall 03
Speaker

Chair

Wen-Long Hu

Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taiwan

Speaker

Co-Chair

Fei Wang

College of Naturopathic Medicine, UK

Session Introduction

Fei Wang

The College of Naturopathic Medicine, UK

Title: How and why acupuncture works? Hypothesis and scientific evidences behind it

Time : 09:50-10:15

Speaker
Biography:

Fei Wang is a PhD Acupuncturist and Traditional Chinese Medicine Doctor. He is a Member of IPTI and Lecturer at The College of Naturopathic Medicine. He successfully completed a 3 year PhD of Acupuncture in Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in 1998. He graduated from Henan College of TCM in China in 1995 with a Bachelor’s degree of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Master of Acupuncture. As a highly experienced acupuncturist and traditional Chinese medicine doctor, as well as a qualified doctor in China, he worked at the renowned Ruijin Hospital (Shanghai) and The Institute of Chinese Medicine (London), and was once commissioned by the Saudi Royalty. He has been actively promoting acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine through clinical practice, research and lecture in China and in Europe since 1992. In addition to his specialty of traditional acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine, he also does cupping, moxibustion and deep-tissue massage, in combination or separately.

Abstract:

Nowadays, few people would argue about the effectiveness of acupuncture, the ancient healing art in treating certain illness. However, the mechanism of acupuncture remains in controversy. For the first time, the author makes his hypothesis public, based on his decades of clinical practice experience and observation. He believes acupuncture works through stimulation to nervous-immune system, the effect must be very similar to vaccination. In another words, acupuncture treatments create pseudo injuries to a living human body in an elaborately controlled manner in order to wake up the living body’s immunity system, or human being’s natural healing capability. It is a “vaccination” for disease prevention, a self-healing “exercise” designated for training on immunity.

Seethalakshmy A

S A Academic and IT Consulting, UK

Title: Rajayoga meditation – Key to perfect health and longevity

Time : 10:15-10:40

Speaker
Biography:

Seethalakshmy A expertised in Rajayoga Power Trranscendental Meditation Society, Malaysia and she is practising the techniques of meditation, healing, sub conscious mind programming, negativity remover and Divine Shield for the past 7 Years. she has been empowered with Kundalini awakening and the art of Pranic Energy Retention by the World Leading Siddha of Yoga, Divine Wisdom and Meditation Practice.

Abstract:

Rajayoga is an ancient practice, popularised by the Indian Sage Pathanjali, which comprises of 8 limbs, namely Yama (Abstaining from unhealthy habits), Niyama (Adhering to healthy habits), Asana (postures for meditation; also includes yoga practices), Pranayama (Breathing Technique), Prathiyahara (The attempt to control the mind), Dharana (The ability to control the mind), Dhiyana (Meditation) and Samaddhi (Superconsciousness). Rajayoga requires the practitioner to retain within one’s self the life force called the Prana through the practice of Pranayama, which is the key to optimal health and longevity. Coupled with meditation, one actually activates all the energy centres in one’s body (called the Chakra), with which constant practice leads to perfect health and disease-free state. We would like to take the opportunity to describe the state-of-the-art Rajayoga technique tailored for current era by our Guru, the world renowned Siddha, Yoga Jnana Sitthar Om Sri Rajayoga Guru (Sri Dr. V. Balakrishnan), who resides in Malaysia and undertakes to teach people from all over the world; the ancient practice of Rajayoga in a simplified and easy-to-follow manner. Real life testimonies of practitioners who have used this technique for health and seen tremendous changes will also be presented.

Chun-En Kuo

KuoKaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taiwan

Title: Acupuncture for treating Sleep disturbance associated tinnitus

Time : 10:40-11:05

Speaker
Biography:

Chun-En is a Medical Doctor of Chinese Medicine, Resident of Acupuncture Department at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. She is trained as a Medical Doctor at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital with experience acupuncture and a passion for CAM studies. Since 2011, she has worked as a CAM resident with a major in acupuncture. She has been a member of Chinese Medical Association of Acupuncture (CMAA) since 2014, and she obtained the documentation of subspecialty in Chinese Dermatology. Her research topics focus on CAM in treating chronic tinnitus, modern medical devices for meridian analysis such as Ryodoraku, and the epidemiologic characteristics of CAM nursing in Taiwan. Her recent research interest is the connection of metabonomics with CAM syndrome differentiation and treatment.

Abstract:

Objective: We sought to investigate the effect of acupuncture treatment on tinnitus. Design: Retrospectively observational analysis of clinical practice. Setting: Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Subjects: Patients who reported tinnitus as their primary complaint at their first visit within a 27-month consecutive period (March 2010 to June 2012) were recruited into the study. The number of cases during the study period determined the sample size. Thirty-nine patients met the eligibility criteria. Ten consecutive patients were collected from otolaryngology department for control. Total forty-nine patients enrolled for the study. Interventions: Patients received acupuncture treatment by using single unilateral acupoint Ting-gong (SI19). Outcome Measures: Questionnaires including the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) and tinnitus severity index (TSI) were recorded, those applied before and after the acupuncture treatment for recognizing the patients situation practically. Any use of remedies and Chinese herbal medicines was recorded. Results: The reduction of THI score was statistically significant from the baseline to the end of the treatment. The observed reduction score was more consistent between women aged 41 to 60 years. Acupuncture treatment seemed to improve the sleep quality of patients. No adverse reactions or complications were encountered resulting from the acupuncture procedure but sourness complaints occasionally. Conclusions: We observed that acupuncture therapy might improve the general well-being and relieve sleep disturbance associated tinnitus. No subjective hearing acuity improvement was observed in laboratory data, possibly due to small sample size. We suggest that further studies to explore the efficacy of acupuncture therapy in relieving of sleep disturbance associated tinnitus to be merited.

Wen-Long Hu

Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Taiwan

Title: Laser Acupuncture in Pain Management

Time : 11:25-11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Wen-Long Hu is the Vice Director, Department of Chinese Medicine at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, an Assistant Professor at Fooyin University, Kaohsiung Medical University, and Chang Gung University. He is invited to write a chapter entitled “Acupuncture for Disorders of Consciousness” in Acupuncture - Clinical Practice, Particular Technics and Special Issues (2011) and one entitled “Explore Laser Acupuncture’s Role” in Acupuncture in Modern Medicine (2013). Prior to his current position, he was Chief of Division of Acupuncture at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital. He has the experiences of clinical practice in low level laser therapy (LLLT) for 20 years and in acupuncture for 25 years. He is invited speaker for lectures in LLLT at many symposiums held by some medical associations. Recently, he is invited to instruct physicians to practice LLLT in workshops. He also involves researches in LLLT, e.g. obesity, metabolic syndrome, stroke, dementia, Parkinsonism, myofascial pain, arthralgia, radiculopathy, etc.

Abstract:

Objective: To determine the therapeutic effect of laser acupuncture in pain management. Methods: This study includes five cases of intractable pain. Each subject was treated once per day (acute pain) or three times per week (chronic pain) with gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) laser (Handylaser Trion, RJ-Laser; Reimers & Janssen GmbH, Winden, Germany; Table 1& 2) therapy. The instrument was used to deliver 0.375 J of energy sequentially to each acupoint or 3 J to each Ashi point, for durations of 5 s or 40 s, respectively. The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and related disability of the patients were evaluated throughout the treatment by WLH. Clinical features: Case1: A 59-year-old man had been unable to chew hard food (e.g. peanuts, etc.) for many years. He complained of jaw pain at rest (VAS = 9) and restriction of mandibular movement over the previous 2 months.. Case 2: A 55-year-old woman complained of pain in the left buttock radiating to her left foot. Case 3: A 50-year-old woman complained of pain, swelling, redness, and heat in her left knee with limited range of motion, which she had experienced since undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) for osteoarthritis 3 months previously. Case 4: We treated an 82-year-old woman with a history of various diseases, including chronic hepatitis C, mild C1/2 canal narrowing, bilateral renal parenchyma disease, osteoporosis, and an old T10 compression fracture. The patient had suffered back pain for 1 week. Case 5: A 47-year-old man had suffered left chest pain caused by a traffic accident 5 days previously.

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaochun Yu, BMed, MMed & PhD is a Professor and Deputy Director of Institute of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Doctoral tutor. His research interest is to explore the mechanism of acupuncture and moxibustion and acupoint specificity as well as joint administration of acupuncture and drugs. So far totally 7 research projects including National Basic Research Programs of China are/were granted by Ministry of Science and Technology of China, National Natural Science Foundation of China and Natural Science Foundation of Beijing (as the Principal Investigator), and more than 90 articles in total were published in SCI and Chinese journals.

Abstract:

Our previous study showed that the cardiac arrhythmias induced by myocardial ischemia and reperfusion were attenuated by the pretreatment of acupuncture. The present study explored further whether intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and connexin 43 (Cx43) are involved in the mediation of the anti-arrhythmic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) pretreatment in the rats subjected to simulative global ischemia and reperfusion (SGIR). SGIR was made in the isolated heart by a lowflow perfusion followed by restoration of the flow to the control level. Adult rats were randomly divided into four groups, namely, normal control group, SGIR group, EA group and EA plus 18 beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (EAG) group. For EA pretreatment, bilateral Neiguan acupoints (PC6) of the rats were stimulated for 30 min once a day for 3 consecutive days. Cx43 antagonist was given to the rats in EAG group 30 minutes before the pretreatment of EA. The resting [Ca2+]i concentration, calcium oscillation, the contents of total Cx43 and non-phosphorylated Cx43 and arrhythmia score were compared among different groups. The results showed that EA pretreatment could produce anti-arrhythmic effect in the rats subjected to SGIR. The anti-arrhythmic effect of EA pretreatment may be due at least partly to the inhibition of SGIR-induced calcium overload and [Ca2+]i oscillations, reduction of non-phosphorylated Cx43 and the enhancement of the corresponding phosphorylated Cx43 in the cardiac cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

This study was undertaken to evaluate the antioxidant effect for the aqueous extract of Psidium guajava unripe fruit peel. Two different methods for extraction were used; microwave and the conventional soxhlet extraction methods for the correlation of their antioxidant effect with their chemical profile. Previous studies was undertaken to evaluate the hypoglycemic, hypolipidaemic and antimicrobial effects, where significant differences were observed between the two extracts. That was followed by HPLC-MSMS analysis for their phenolic content. As expected, the two extracts showed variations in their phenolic profile, which were used to justify the differences in their pharmacological effects.

Prathamesh V Karpe

Gomantak Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya & Research Centre, India

Title: The concept of Urolithiasis (Ashmari) in Ayurveda

Time : 12:50-13:30

Speaker
Biography:

Prathamesh V Karpe has a Bachelors degree in Ayurveda Medicine & Surgery from Goa University and MS (Shalyatantra) from Maharashtra University of Health Science, Nasik, Maharashtra, India. He is currently practicing Ayurveda in Goa and attached as honorary Lecturer and consultant at Gomantak Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya & Research centre, Shiroda Goa- India and Ayurclinic-Goa, Baga-Goa India. He has presented various research papers at Ayurveda seminars in India and abroad.

Abstract:

Urolithiasis is the stone formed in urinary tract (kidney, ureter, bladder and urethra). Synonym for Urolithiasis is urine stone/calculi. In Ayurveda it is known as Ashmari which means calculi or stone and its small powder like pieces are known as Sharkara or Sikatai.e. gravels. In Sushruta Samhita, Sushrutacharya explains the two process of stone formation. One is by the stagnation and super saturation of the urine and other by crystallization of the crystalloids in the urine. Charakacharya in Charka Samhita more specifically explains the process of gall bladder stone formation. Various herbal formulations are mentioned in classical texts and are found effective till today. Specific group of drugs are mentioned on basis of type of stone on its Doshas combinations. Urine stones are classified on basis of doshas – Vata, Pitta, Kapha etc and treatment is mentioned accordingly. The drugs like Varuna, Pashanabheda, Troonapanchamoola, Gokshura, Punarnava, Apamargakshar etc. are advised to be administered either in form of decoctions, fermented solutions, powder, cold infusions etc or in form of dietary products like cooked rice, gruel etc. Stones which are too large and not responding to medicinal treatment should be extracted surgically and for this Sushruta had mentioned perineal approach to remove the stone from the bladder. This paper will deal with the literature and clinical aspect of the Urolithiasis and its management in Ayurveda.

Suzanne M Enoh-Arthur

Akafro Moringa Herbal Food/Medicine Clinic, UK

Title: Tree crop production of Moringa oleifera supports food and medicine healing practices

Time : 15:25-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Suzanne M Enoh-Arthur current study supports folklore identification of the Moringacaeae family in ancient and current African Traditional Food and Medicine Systems to promote its role in primary healthcare settings alongside developing Moringa oleifera (Lam). tree crop cultivation on degraded household farm lands to increase yields of desirable local food crops whilst ensuring value added natural resources for household nutrition, clinical heath studies, apprenticeship, alternative income generation and small-scale entrepreneurship development in West (Ghana) and Central (Cameroon) Africa.

Abstract:

Many countries are seeking ways of making best use of local natural resources. Hippocrates once said “let medicine be your food and food your medicine”. Hence the need to support African homes, institutions and local communities with domestication of natural resources for their food and medicine values. This is in line with a WHO resolution of 2000, which recognises and recommends the acceleration of local production of traditional medicinal plants. Many traditional medicinal properties of such plants like Moringa oleifera (Lam.) of the Moringaceae family are confirmed by studies that validate ethnobotanical herbal food and medicinal use practices of indigenous people worldwide. This study uses a Ghana perspective in the Volta region, Hohoe district, village of TafiAbuife, observing two groups of households belonging to local farmworkers who identified ‘yevu-ti’, (the Ewe name of moringa, meaning the white man’s tree). The research examines if people had knowledge and access to sustainable sources of medicinal plants for food and medicine, would they use it for healing? Hence the hypothesis ‘if people had healing knowledge and access to Moringa as herbal food and medicine then the latter will use Moringa as food and medicine for healing’. This was tested in different households and evidence used to support current domiciliary health care for farmworkers in an African village. The recruitment of participants by announcementin the village of Tafi Abuife, where baseline information suggested local people had access to Moringa trees planted as live fence in their localities but they had no knowledge of anycurrent domiciliary use of Moringa as herbal food and medicine. Moringa tree crop production in household gardens and farms with the processing of herbal food and medicines was completed over five years involving participants in group1 [Tafi Abuife local community residents (n=208)] and group 2 [workers of Bomarts Farm (n= 67)]. Face to face discussions, semi structured questionnaires and household analysis were used for data collection. From observations contrasted with baseline information there was evidence of herbal food and medicine use in some households in the studied locality. Over 38.9% of households in group 1 and 58.2% in group 2 responded positively to currently using Moringa in domiciliary herbal food and medicine healing practices, with a direct impact on over 30% children living in such households from an exploratory health survey completed in 2010. Both groups cited ownership of sustainable access to Moringa trees in household gardens and farms which also brought income from sale of raw and value added Moringa leaf and seeds. Peer-to peer and common initiative groups’ stimulated discussions within and between groups at home, and at work sharing information about domiciliary food and medicine, healing practices whilst learning from one another. A change in practice from single live fence Moringa trees to tree crop production has supported the acceleration of sustainable access and ownership to Moringa natural resource for food and medicine healing practices.

Speaker
Biography:

Lucia Maria N F de Albuquerque is specializing in floral therapy. She is a member of the group of complementary and alternative therapies studies from the Nursing School University of Sao Paulo.

Abstract:

Among people who live in slums there is a big number of children and teenagers that live in a constant risky situation. The facts of risk are those that, if present, inscrease the possibility of a child to develop an emotional or behavioural disorder. The aim of this research is to analyze the results of Bach essences in the treatment of fears and traumas in children who live in a poor situation. This is a randomized clinical trial, double-blind, with quantitative and qualitative approach. The children and the art therapist expert, who will analyze the fear and trauma won’t know who integrates each group. The research will be carried out in the non-governmental organization called “Gotas de Flor com Amor”. There are 17 children, between 6 and 8 years old, that will be participating and the group will be divided in two: experimental and placebo. The first group will receive the flower essences for fear and trauma: Rock Rose, Mimulus, Aspen, Star of Bethlehem and the second group will receive only water. The intervention will last 60 days. The effect of the Flower essences will be analysed quantitatively and qualitatively by an expert through the creation of a garden using the principles of art therapy in 3 different moments: In the beginning, in the middle and in the end of the study. This project was approved by the research ethic board from Sao Paulo University Nursering School. The meeting with the children’s parents has already been held in order to explain them the research and to get their approval and signature of the Consent Form.

Speaker
Biography:

Leia Fortes Salles, RN, PhD is a Post doctorated from the Nursing School - University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. She is specializing in Integrative Medicine, Iridology and Flower Therapy. She is a member of the group of complementary and alternative therapies studies -National Research Council.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to compare the development of diabetes mellitus in subjects with and without the sign of the Cross of Andreas in the iris over a period of four years. Participated in this cohort study was 91 patients without the disease, with and without the signal. The monitoring was conducted by means of the records. At the end of the research, 28.2% of the group with the sign of the Cross of Andreas was diagnosed with diabetes and 56.5% had two or more episodes of impaired glucose tolerance. In the group without the signal, 4.4% were diagnosed with the disease and 24.5% had two or more episodes of glucose intolerance. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding the development of the disease and glucose intolerance. The group with the Cross of Andreas developed more glucose intolerance and diabetes than the other group.

Speaker
Biography:

O S Awotunde has completed his MSc from University of Ilorin and is presently doing his PhD at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso Nigeria. He is presently a Lecturer at Habib Medical School, IUIU Kampala Uganda. He has presented papers at many conferences in Nigeria, Uganda and India. He is co-author of a published paper in reputed journal and has a published paper and 2 published abstract papers. He teaches Biochemistry and serves as Departmental Tutorial Head.

Abstract:

The aqueous extract of Massularia acuminate root a plant with androgenic potentials at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight was investigated for its toxicological implication on selected enzyme activities, liver function and kidney function parameters in vivo and In vitro in male Wistar rats. Phytochemical screening reveals the presence of alkaloids, anthraquinones, saponins, phenolics, flavonoids and tannins in the extract. It caused labilization in some organs whereas it induced the synthesis of enzymes in some others by the increase and decrease (p<0.05) in the activities of alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. There was increase (p<0.05) in serum total and conjugated bilirubin, increase (p<0.05) in serum globulin and serum albumin at the highest dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. A significant increase (p<0.05) in sodium and potassium ions at various doses following the administration of the extract was revealed. Also an increase (p<0.05) in potassium and calcium ions occurred after day 7 following the administration of the extract at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight. The serum urea and creatinine increased at all doses. Therefore, such alterations in the normal levels of the liver and kidney function indices, and tissue enzymes might adversely affect the normal functioning of the biomolecules and by extension, the organs.

Speaker
Biography:

Duquesne Marilyn has completed her master thesis at the University of Mons (UMONS) on a subject related to the Balkan Endemic Nephropathy, and obtained a PhD grant on which she is currently working. The result acquired during the master thesis has been published. This funding is co-funded by Joelle Nortier, Head of the department of dialysis and kidney transplantation at Erasme Hospital in Belgium, and Jean-Marie Colet, Head of the Human Biology & Toxicology laboratory at UMONS. This collaboration, already initiated during my master thesis, now includes the Nephrology Department of Zagreb University Hospital headed by Bojan Jelakovic.

Abstract:

Aristolochic acid (AA) produced by some plants from the Aristolochia genus, Asarum and Bragantia species, is a common term to define the mixture of structurally related nitrophenantrene carboxylic acid derivatives. AA-I and AA-II are the major components of such mixtures and are structurally similar except for the presence of an0-methoxy group on AA-I. Various Aristolochia species are used in traditional medicines for the treatment of diverse disorders like snakebites, fever, gout, infection, diarrhea, arthritis, rheumatism. Due to severe adverse effects, including urothelial cancers and renal deficiency, encountered in self-medicating patients, Aristolochia-based remedies are nowadays forbidden in Europe and in the United States. On the contrary, those plants are still commonly used as herbal remedies in Iran, India, Bangladesh and many other parts of the world. Rat models of acute and chronic AAI and/or AAII-induced toxicity have been developed and described in the literature. Due to the renal organotropism of AA toxicities, our laboratory was interested in studying the urinary metabonomic profiles of rats exposed to those toxicants. This new “omic” concept allowed to identify which part of the kidney is mostly affected, the toxic mode of action and to discover potential urine biomarkers of the pathology.

Speaker
Biography:

Fikile Vilakazi has more than 18 years of work experience. She has been working in the fields of youth, women, gender, entrepreneurship development, and sexuality at different times in all these years. Her areas of focus included training, public education and advocacy. She had an opportunity to do student support and mentoring, field work, outreach programs, community mobilization, and building partnerships, manage and direct programs. She has six years of that period dedicated to fundraising, directing an organization, providing strategic direction to processes, organizational development including human, financial and technical resource management, monitoring and evaluation. Her experience has mainly been with student movements, community based and non-governmental organizations, coalitions and local government. In that time she has been exposed to different approaches and paradigms namely (1) integrated approach to development, (2) human rights based approach, (3) gender mainstreaming, (4) feminist approach and ideology. He/She is currently pursuing a Doctoral degree majoring in social and public policy with the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland.

Abstract:

Public participation in the development of regulation/legislation has gained increased prominence within the international research community, inspiring some theorists and policy-makers to talk of a ‘new paradigm’ for research and many organizations to review and reform their research programmes and practices. Although much is known about African traditional medicines, there are still many unanswered questions about its regulation. Ensuring broader public participation can have a real impact on the promotion and authentication of anecdotal knowledge of African traditional medicines throughout the world. This can change the ways in which government or concerned organizations think and act while dealing with the development of African traditional medicines regulation. This research was aimed at measuring the level of public participation and the role of trust and reciprocity amongst African Traditional Health Practitioners (ATHPs) from the Thembisile Hani Local Municipality in the regulation of African Traditional Medicines (ATMs) in South Africa. A quantitative research methodology was employed throughout the research process and data collected using self-administered questionnaires. The results indicate that reciprocity and trust play a statistically significant role (P>|t| value of 0.00 in reciprocity and 0.01 in trust) to influence levels of participation. In addition high levels of trust in government (62%) by ATHPs correlated with ATHPs decreased levels of participation in the current regulation of ATMs by government.

Speaker
Biography:

Bushra Ahmad has recently submitted her PhD thesis. She has worked for six months at University of Oxford as visiting research student to conduct a part of her PhD research. She has published 10 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Dicliptera roxburghiana (Acanthaceae) is used as general tonic and for wound healing in traditional medicine system of Pakistan. This research project was designed to investigate the nephroprotective effects of methanol extract of D. roxburghiana (DRME) on CCl4 induced renaltoxicity in mice. Balb c mice (42) were treated with their respective doses for 30 days. Group 1 was control group. Group II was administered with DMSO and olive oil. Group III was treated with CCl4 (1 ml/kg b.w; 20% in olive oil). Group IV was administered with CCl4 and Silymarin (50 mg/kg). Group V and VI were administered with CCl4 and DRME 40 and 60 mg/ kg b.w. respectively. Group VII received DRME 60 mg/kg b.w. urine profile showed low pH, decreased level of urine proteins whereas elevated levels of specific gravity, red and white blood cells and urea in CCl4 treated group. Serum analysis revealed decreased overall proteins, albumin and globulin whereas elevated creatinine, urobilinogen and bilirubin levels in CCl4 intoxicated mice. Antioxidant enzymese Catalase, Peroxidase, Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione-S-transferaseand Glutathione reductase were low whereas γ-GT was high in kidney of CCl4 treated group. Furthermore, decreased GSH contents and total tissue proteins while elevated TBARS contents and damaged DNA were noticed in CCl4 intoxicated kidney. Renal histoarchitecture showed cellular infiltration, glomerular atrophy, dilated tubules and damaged Bowman’s capsule in CCl4 intoxicated mice. These anomalies were reversed by DRME doses. On the basis of our results obtained in this study, we suggest the protective role of D. roxburghiana in renal toxicity.

Speaker
Biography:

Dongshuo is currently a PhD student in Health Research at Lancaster University. She received Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) training in Fujian TCM University, and BA in intercultural communication and MSc in Research Methodology at the University of Manchester. She is the Co-founder of the TCM Clinic at the University of Manchester where staff and students with stress can be treated. She has been researching and developing TCM in the west, and has given talks in China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Oxford University, and Manchester University etc., and has published a dozen papers in journals and as book chapters.

Abstract:

This study explored Chinese international students’ perceptions of health and wellbeing in relation to the attitude towards and use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). The perceptions were identified from three aspects: social perceptions concerning with individuals’ daily interactions with others; environmental perceptions dealing with individuals functioning effectively in their physical environment; and psychological perceptions centring round individual characteristics related to a person’s well-being in society. The qualitative data from individual and focus group interviews in this study revealed that Confucianism has greatly shaped the social and psychological perceptions and the way in which health, wellbeing, and treatment are conceptualised and practiced. Taoism dominates environmental perceptions of health and wellbeing with the theory of naturalism, emphasizing the impact of environmental factors on disease. Data analysis illustrated that the reasons that Chinese international students used TCM to cope with the adjustments are: problems that cannot be cured in Western medicine (WM), recommendation from friends and relatives, habitual action inherited from families and being familiar with the Chinese approach to illness. The reasons for not using TCM are listed as the high cost, lack of information about TCM clinics, inconsistency of practitioners’ professional levels, the length of curing illness, the inconvenience to consume the herbs and disclosure of clinical secrets. These factors are discussed with reference to literature review, and suggestions and recommendations are put forward.